To the east lies Kahili ahupuaʻa and to the west lies Kalihiwai in the district of Haleleʻa. Kīlauea means Spewing, much spreading


 

Kīlauea: Spewing, much spreading

An ahupuaʻa of the Koʻolau district. To the east lies Kahili ahupuaʻa and to the west lies Kalihiwai in the district of Haleleʻa. There are few loʻi (irrigated taro fields) in this ahupuaʻa because most of the arable land is far above streams.  There are three long ʻauwai (irrigation ditches) far inland, so ancient that legends say that they are the claw marks of a moʻo (dragon or lizazrd). The land would have grown sweet potatoes and gourds.

From the plains, before the days of sugar cane, three large stones stood on the slopes of the crater. These were once three sisters named Kalama, Pua and Lāhela. They were turned to stone by the goddess of the volcano, Pele, as she sought a home for herself and her lover Lohi’au. At this place she came upon these girls. They were so beautiful that Pele became jealous, fearful that Lohi’au would see them and fall in love with them. So she turned them to stone and from then on never went back because “the sooner she gets out of their sight, the better she feels”. (Juliette Ferreira, Kamehameha School for Girls, Martha Beckwith contest, 1938)